Penicuik House Estate

Another good walk with the Strollers in an area I would not consider visiting myself, simply because I did not know about it.

Great views of the Pentland hills, brushed with snow as we had some snowfall recently, interesting history and architecture. There are a number of monuments/follies spread around the estate, a ruin of a house that burned down and the current house of the owners which used to be stables. It made for a fine 5 miles in brisk weather.

Hope you like the pictures that I took that day

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Best autumn walks

I am not a great fan of autumn, but it does offer splendid walking and photographic opportunities if the weather is decent.

I thought I would compile a couple of ideas for autumn walking. These are my favourite places for an autumn walk where you can be with nature and experience the great autumn colours to snap a couple of shots.

  1. Hermitage of Braid in Edinburgh

Nice and easy to get to if you live in Edinburgh. Great place for a short walk and a coffee afterwards in the café near the entrance. It is not that long, about 4 miles but can be extended by walking onto Blackford hill for great views of Edinburgh.

2. Cammo Estate

One of my all time favourites because it is different in every season and so varied. Walking from Cramond Brig you can see some ponies, great nature, nice old bridges, ruins of a homestead, and of course the estate itself. Plus it is really easy to get to. I have been here many times and it is never boring.

Distance – around 4 miles.

See: Cammo Estate in Edinburgh

3. Water of Leith – Colinton Dell

One of the most popular walks in Edinburgh which takes you through a varied terrain. My favourite part needs to be around Colinton and Spylaw Park.

Distance – around 4 miles.

4. Gifford – Yester castle

I love, love, love this walk! Firstly, Gifford is a lovely little village of the beaten track. It has lovely architecture and cafes. Secondly, the walk to Yester Castle and seeing Hobgoblin Ha’ is an interesting experience in itself. Walk can be expanded to even 8 miles by walking to Garvald which is nice as well.

Distance – between 4 and 8 miles.

5. Hermitage in Dunkeld

I must admit – I have not been there in a long time, but this place is a must in autumn. I have seen photos from other photographers and they were always amazing. Plenty of paths in Tay Forest park, lovely cathedral and river Tay, plus hermitage itself will make a nice day out.

Distance – 2 miles plus

6. Pitlochry to Killiecrankie along the river Garry.

Again, another one I gave a miss for a long time but it is a really really good walk. Plus you get great views from Garry Bridge, Soldier’s leap and afterwards you have Pitlochry to enjoy which is oh so nice!

Distance: about 6 miles.

7. Almondell Country Park

This one is so close to me as I can walk there from my house. The walk from visitor centre to Linn’s Mill is particularly nice and not that popular. And the views are quite scenic and varied.

Distance: about 5 miles.

I have created a map that shows some points of interest:

autumn walks

Hope you like them and will enjoy the walks!

 

 

 

 

Glasgow Mural Trail

Encouraged by seeing a lot of fellow photographers and online communities, and also because my illness would not allow me to have a long walk that I would normally have, I decided to head to Glasgow to discover the famous murals.

Glasgow is not a place that is easy to photograph. It does not jump at you. It could be described as ugly, messy, chaotic… But there are definitely things to discover there.

One of the projects to beautify the streets of Glasgow, was commissioning a couple of artists to decorate some buildings in the centre with murals in hope of attracting tourism. They are amazing, and it is a treasure hunt trying to find them. Some are stunning, some are just ok, some are in not the nicest places or surrounded by bins, or located in dark corners where strange things happen.

Anyway, it is something different and definitely worth doing.

One downside to it is that two of the murals were taken down. View of the Clyde was replaced with windows of a gym and Five Faces (both seemed really cool in pictures) was just taken down by the council.

Needless to say, it was still a bit of walk although all of them are in the centre and quite close to each other.

I used information from here and here

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The views from North Berwick Law

North Berwick is a little town in East Lothian which is a popular weekend destination for all kinds of people – some are walkers, some just like to enjoy the famous chippy, some like to have a stroll around the shops (which are nice) or spend some time in one of many cafes or play golf.

All in all, it satisfies needs of many and mine, too. With Edinburgh strollers we enjoyed a Saturday walk along the beach, then through the town and the park and up North Berwick Law, which is part of an extinct volcano.

Wild ponies were a bit of a surprise, as they are usually seen on nearby Traprain Law, and the views never disappoint. You can see as far as Edinburgh and admire Tantallon Castle, Bass Rock and the rural landscape.

 

Craiglockhart Hills

A walk hosted by Diane took us to two of seven hills of Edinburgh – Wester and Easter Craiglockhart hills. The weather was mercifuland it just rained a little and we had a chance to see the Pentland hills, and a vast part of Edinburgh.

The top of the hill also features the original Napier University building, which was used as a mental hospital, a wedding venue and is soon going to be converted into flats. We reckon, you will need a couple of million to get one of them.

Definitely worth a visit, my favourite picnic spot so far.

Traprain Law from East Linton

This little hill stands out when you drive down to England on the A1. My goal was to find a way to climb it. As I was made an organiser of walks, I decided to tackle this one and include it on one of my walks. We started off in East Linton which is a beautiful village itself, then followed the Tyne river to Hailes Castle. After that, a short field walk and we could climb the hill. It’s sharp but short and offers extensive views of East Lothian towards the Firth of Forth and Fife.

Although it’s just over 220 m above sea level, the views of the countryside are just amazing. And because the weather was good, we could actually see something!

There was seven of us, we all enjoyed our little outing.

Inchcolm

Mentioned by Shakespeare in Macbeth:

“That now Sweno, the Norwayes King,Craves composition:Nor would we deigne him buriall of his men,Till he disbursed, at Saint Colmes ynch,Ten thousand Dollars, to our generall use”

the island lies just off the coast of Fife. It is a popular tourist destination  with its Augustine Abbey (dating back to as far as 9th century), the military building remains and offers fantastic views of Edinburgh.

The cruise to the island itself is also full of attractions, as you can admire the Forth bridges, and wildlife (puffins, shags, gulls, porpoises and seals).

It was on my bucket list for a long time because I am a Historic Scotland member and would like to visit as many sites as I could. But my dream was also to see the puffins and seals. And so we did along with 46 members of Gentle Jaunts group.

The island is also inhabited by lots and lots of seagulls and because it was their nesting season, they were getting quite anxious and we experienced a couple of Hitchcock moments. It was still fun!